Blog

The Center blog is teeming with tips and inspiration for starting and maintaining your writing practice.

The act and process of writing has well-documented mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual health benefits. Here is a three-step process for pursuing them through a journaling practice.
Shawna Ayoub Ainslie offers some guidance for stripping your writing of unnecessary repetition while staying on the track of your intended meaning.
My place has been staged all summer, chairs and umbrellas distanced 10 or more feet, for the few friends who have visited. And when they go, the chairs are empty, still, orderly and beautiful. Waiting...
What are you afraid of? What should scare you, but doesn't? What can you appreciate about the thing that scares you the most in the world?
Think about where you are right now and where you want to go in your writing practice, then read on for guidance on who to bring along:
I write because the words need to come out and, when they do, that’s when I feel my best. Centered. The most like myself.
When I had my own children I moved to Long Island. In the summer, I felt nostalgia, trapped in the airless frenzy of traffic, the earth paved over, asphalt heat waves, car exhaust. I dreamed of moving to the country, but didn’t see how I could uproot. I wished it would happen miraculously. Then it did.
These late summer sunflowers stretching to soak up the light, lifting their heavy heads to the sky, sturdy stalks like tree trunks--there is an easy metaphor here. What sustains you?
As a writer, your task is to make everything you write sound like it came from you and only you. Here is a four-step exercise to help guide you in the process of defining your unique voice as a writer.
Without some thoughtfulness about the fear or anxiety you encounter when writing, you might not be able to get any words down.